Active Duty Fishing

 
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Love to fish and be on some water doesn’t matter where. I grew up in a migrant farm worker family, and we spent most of our time traveling and sleeping in the car. Sometimes we would stop by a body of water, so I would get out my ball of fishing line and my hook, cut a stick and fish while my father took a nap. My father and older brother would go fishing, but they did not want to take me – so, I would hide behind the front seat until they had gone far enough that he would not take me back home. That’s what I had to do to go fishing (as a child).

At the age of 17, I enlisted in the U.S. Army and spent 24 years in service to our country. While in Vietnam I would sot and look at the waters and wonder how the fishing would be. Once we built a base camp by the coast of the South China Sea, and I had my brother send a Zebco 33 so I could try the fishing. Turns out the Viet Cong sappers would use the shore at night to set mines, so the Army put the area off limits.

Throughout my time in the service, the first thing I did at a new post, I would look for the fishing spots and use them as much as possible. Couldn’t buy a boat, wasn’t in one place long enough. After retiring from the Army I bought used boats because that,s what I could afford. They constantly had mechanical problems, so I would go out even if I had to be towed in. I did a lot of bank fishing wherever I could. I fished the places most people just passed up.

I would like to say thank you for your show, I have watched many all over the country, but the stories on yours are the first that have touched my heart in a way that I can’t explain.

Thank you,

Jimmy L